Vancouver Movers Guide Archives - Ferguson Moving

Moving Pool Accessories

While one may not think of Vancouver’s climate as being a hotspot for homeowners with swimming pools, they do exist. Vancouver homes with pools are also on the market, if you want to move from one home to another, and keep your swimming pool lifestyle (whether outdoor or indoor). An MLS search such as this one can help you find Vancouver homes with swimming pools.

But when you move from one swimming pool home to another, you may want to bring some accessories with you. Yes, it’s true you might negotiate the swimming pool accessories and equipment along with the sale of the house. However, depending on the value and quantity of your pool accessories, it may be a cost savings to bring them along with you.

Plus, if you have kids, and the new buyers don’t, you might be able to get away with bringing your pool slide and paddleboards with you. Also, your buyers may not care for the coloured lights you’ve chosen, or they may plan on using a different heating type for their pool, and so on.

All of these items have value, plus varying costs to operate or maintain. So, pools do come with buyer preferences. And that’s where you may end up deciding to bring some pool equipment or accessories with you.

Below are some tips for handling the relocation, or moving, of your pool equipment and accessories:

Take an inventory of your pool parts, understand what they are, and what they’re worth

Before you jump to include your pool and all its equipment or accessories into the sale price of your home, it would be good to know what they’re worth. This is especially if you bought the pool along with the house, and aren’t aware of the installation values, product values and so on.

To start, you can learn about used pool equipment through this eBay article:

https://www.ebay.com/gds/How-to-Buy-Used-Pool-Equipment-/10000000177627680/g.html

There are also pool accessories listed for sale on eBay here:

https://www.ebay.com/bhp/swimming-pool-accessories

And, as this article states, a professional pool inspection as part of house inspection services can help with this stage. This will also let you know the condition that the pool equipment is in, and if anything needs replacing, or updating.

At this point, you can decide whether to sell your pool equipment and accessories as one-off pieces, bring them with you or add them to the value of your home. Speak to your realtor about these options as well.

Pool equipment, whether for inground or above-ground pools, can refer to:

  • Pumps
  • Filters
  • Heaters (an optional part)
  • Plumbing & electricity lines (see this article for more info)
  • LED lights (though these can be considered an accessory)
  • Electricity breakers
  • Chemical dispensers

Pool accessories can refer to:

  • Slides
  • Diving boards
  • Steps or ladders
  • Pool covers (including automated ones)
  • Life jackets and lifesaver buoys
  • Leaf skimmers or nets
  • Pool thermometers or testers
  • Pool machine cleaners (various kinds) or vacuums
  • Complimentary deck furniture
  • Pool noodles, inflatables, paddle boards, etc.
  • Fountains
  • Chemicals, salts or cleaning products
  • Alarm systems
  • Drain covers and other small parts
  • Liners

A store website like this one can give even more examples of the categories of items you will need to keep, or sell, if you are a pool owner.

Disassemble and photograph complex pool equipment you plan on moving

Whether you want to move your pool equipment a few feet away, or to a new location entirely, keep in mind this will involve complex work. A typical house mover that moves your furniture may not be the person to call. Specialized pool service people would need to come in, as well as qualified electricians, and perhaps plumbers. Plus, in some cases, you may need certain building permits, or assurances that you are complying with legal safety codes when implementing the changes. So, moving pool equipment is also not a cheap thing to do. This article explains more about the process.

This video explains a little bit about moving just a pump and filter.

When you do any part of the pool equipment move yourself, you will definitely want to take an inventory of parts. You also should be taking photographs of the finished products before you disassemble them. And, record the steps you’re taking, from even before the point of drainage, so you can do them in reverse later, if possible. That way, you can have a reference for how things were set up originally. This goes especially for older equipment where you may not be able to search online for instruction manuals!

Preparing and moving pool accessories

While underground or specialized pool equipment would need servicemen, some of your pool accessories could be moved on your own, of course. Still, if you are unscrewing anything (such as slides or diving boards that are bolted down), you will want to follow the above procedures.

And, make sure kids are not trying to use the slide while it’s not secured! If you are taking down gates or barriers while children are around, you may also want to drain the pool for safety too.

It goes without saying that any lighter, portable accessories should be dried, cleaned and deflated (if applicable) before moving. Of course, you’ll also want to contain the items in bins or bags (perhaps mesh bags?). Don’t let them sit wet in tightly closed conditions for too long, to avoid mould growth.

Remember also that you can’t bring chemicals into moving trucks! They will need to go into your own car, or safely disposed of according to your local bylaws.

To conclude: moving pool accessories equipment involves many services and costs, which may not be worth the hassle

As you can see from the information above, moving pool equipment can be so complex, you may decide not to go for it. The procedure could only be done partially on your own, if you are not a qualified electrician, plumber or swimming pool specialist. And, there will be costs for transport too, even if you could detach and bring pool machinery with you.

So the hassle alone can be a deterrent. This is especially so if you’re planning the move apart from a bigger renovation project. In that case, pool equipment would only be moving a short distance, on the same property. Or, other solutions (such as replacements or cover-ups) can come into play.

It is more likely that you may end up moving your pool ‘toys’ and accessories with you. Movers in Vancouver can help with this, as these items usually don’t involve specialized training or legalities (minus the chemicals, which can’t go in moving trucks).

Plus, if you move into a new home which also has a pool, you may find that you have everything you need built in already.

See related articles:

Moving a Rug

Moving a rug. It might sound like the simplest thing to not write about, but the topic may surprise you in its detail. Well, not that much detail. But enough for us to share a few tips that might be helpful!

Let’s get into it!

Before you moving a rug, measure their sizes and your new floor space

You may have rugs at your current home, which you plan to bring to your new home. We’ll call these your ‘old’ rugs, even though you may continue to use them.

The first thing to assess is the size of existing rugs, and the comparison to the floor space at your new home. It has been said that rugs can change the feeling of a room’s spaciousness. Furniture should overlap a rug to a degree.

When moving a rug to your new home, you will want to know if you will get the same visual effect, or if the room’s size will determine that you need new rugs for certain rooms. Of course, this applies mostly to larger spaces you may move into. Though in some cases, your rugs may also be too big to fit into your new space.

Resize your rug?

Another option is to resize your rug. Yes, it’s possible! Rug repair persons or makers like this one can cut down rugs, or even enlarge them. If you can’t find a rug resizer through a google search, try checking if carpet cleaners can do it, as alluded to by Apartment Therapy here.

Determine the cost and value of your existing rugs, or new rugs

There are cheap rugs, and there are expensive ones. If you have a rug that is an imperfect size, but was imported from an exotic country where rug weaving is a deep-rooted tradition, then you might have more incentive to keep it anyway. Whether it stays rolled up in storage, or used regardless of its size, sometimes keeping the rug of value has its longer-term benefits.

If you’ve got cheap rugs, consider selling or donating them. The cost of new ones to fit your new space will probably be well worth the investment. And hey, this time around you might be able to splurge on the fancy ones!

Some rugs can be worth a lot, especially if they are antiques. This article explains more about determining the value of your old rug.

Clean your rugs before moving

Before you move your rug, you will want to give it a good clean. You can hire carpet cleaners to do this, or do it yourself. To clean a rug yourself, you will need a space to get it wet, and to hang dry it. Depending on the type of rug you have, the method you use for cleaning can vary. This article explains more, including a tip to check for colour loss before you go overboard on cleaning products!

Some rugs can go in the washing machine (with no guarantees!). And, nowadays you can also buy washable rugs. For example, Ruggable (not a sponsor) has made a product specifically to avoid this hassle of toilsome rug washing!

Prep and protect your rugs for moving

When moving rugs you will no doubt need to roll them up (when they are dry after cleaning of course!).

To keep them in rolled position, and to avoid the roll from loosening, you can tie them with string. Even better, if you have carrying straps, moving straps or something like a yoga mat strap your lifting and transporting will be so much easier. Moving straps can be quite cheap, and can be useful for other items you may want to move yourself on moving day.

Wrap your rug in some large plastic (for example, painter’s plastic sheeting) for protection. You wouldn’t want your hard work of cleaning that rug to go to waste on the move!

If you have a rubber underlay, padding or sticky strips under your rug, of course you’ll want to properly shake those off, clean them and pack them too.

It’s time to transport your rugs in the moving truck! Be careful, they can be heavier than they look!

After moving a rug, restyle your new home

If you’ve followed our tips above, you’ve already got measurements in mind for your new rug.

But if you’re one of those people that believes rugs can make or break a room’s style, there will be more to consider. For example, colour and material. This article on Apartment Therapy goes into more detail on how to choose a rug that’s right for your new home.

And, don’t forget that rugs don’t just have to lay flat! You can hang them on the wall for a bohemian look. This article explains how.

See our related articles:

 

North Vancouver Movers On How To Move A Treadmill

As professional North Vancouver movers, we’re no strangers to moving exercise equipment. In 2008, we were even responsible for moving treadmills and bikes to the Olympic Oval. We were so proud of that moment, we put it in our gallery!

 

Anyway, enough of our gloating. We thought we’d give you some tips on how to move a treadmill. Let’s dive in:

Have the right equipment ready to move a treadmill

 

Just like our articles on:

 

 

You’re going to need the right equipment. (And yes, we have more ‘How to move a…’ articles on our blog, should you wish to search for them!).

 

The good news is that when you move one of the above, you’ll likely have some of the equipment needed to move a treadmill. So there may be overlap here.

 

Some main moving supplies you’ll need to move a treadmill are:

 

  • Moving straps
  • Moving blankets
  • Gloves with grip
  • Drill or screwdriver (if disassembly is needed). Sometimes an allen key works too.
  • Moving dollies (find the right one by reading this)
  • Plastic wrap (to hold together foldable treadmills)

 

And, if you’re really wanting to protect your treadmill, an A-frame wouldn’t be a bad idea either.

Know your type of treadmill before you plan to move it

 

Different types of treadmills require different measures to move them. This article on eBay sums up the kinds you can buy on the market. The important questions you’ll need to ask for moving a treadmill are:

 

  • Is it foldable? If so, how do we safely fold this model? (i.e. there may be a latch or special way to do this)
  • If it’s not foldable, should we take it apart to move it? And what equipment do we need to take it apart? (We’d say ‘yes’ to taking it apart)
  • Is there a safety key we need to unplug, or keep plugged in?
  • Is the rubber track band removable? If not, how will we prevent it from getting damaged or warped during the move?
  • Are there electrical parts that need to be protected from moisture during the move?
  • Are there wheels to help us move the treadmill? If so, how will we unsecure them?

 

If you find yourself needing to move a foldable treadmill, this will likely be your easiest option. Simply follow manufacturer instructions to fold it down, get it flat, cover it up, then find a safe, immovable spot to lean it against in the moving truck.

 

For the non-foldable types of treadmills, you may have the easiest experience taking it apart, even if it feels like a hassle in the beginning.

 

Finally, get an idea of weight. Treadmills can be heavy, and the last thing you’d want is to injure yourself while moving one. Use the right protocols when moving anything heavy, but for a treadmill, get friend or two to help out as well.

Store the removal parts of a treadmill together

 

Staying organized when you move any object is important. But with a treadmill, it’s even more so. This is because some of it’s smaller parts, like removal bolts or screws, may be specially sized for their use (or ok, maybe you can get them at the hardware store, but that will be a hassle). But the most important thing is not losing the key! If you do, you’ll have a real problem because the treadmill is designed not to work without it. According to this article, you should be taping all the parts you can to the frame of the treadmill, so you don’t lose them. That includes chords.

 

It goes without saying you’ll need to unplug the treadmill and all its chords before moving it.

Prevent temperature and debri damage when moving your treadmill

 

According to this article, storing your treadmill in a garage is bad enough. It explains how temperature fluctuations and dirt in a treadmill’s motor can render warranties ineffective.

 

Now, think about how these same ‘treadmill enemies’ can affect your exercise equipment while moving. If you’re moving long distance, consider the climate changes the treadmill will endure during the move. Will it be outside in very cold temperatures overnight? Will the truck be dirty and dusty?

 

While you may be fine with something like a treadmill going through one move on a cold or hot day, it’s good to take precautions. At the very least keep a blanket over it. And ask about moving insurance.

 

It also goes without saying that you shouldn’t be placing items on top of your treadmill while it’s in the moving truck. Instead, find a way to lean flat it against something, whether horizontally or vertically. Don’t move it whole into the truck, then pack boxes on the rubber track. You’ll want to keep that free from potential damage, so you don’t have to replace any parts later.

After moving a treadmill, protect the floor it sits on

 

This article explains how treadmills can damage floors, and how to prevent it. If your treadmill was on a carpet at your old home, and your new home has hardwood, you may have a problem. Use the solutions given in the aforementioned article to protect your floors.

Watch some videos on how to move a treadmill

 

Sometimes, a video helps a lot.

 

When you read articles like this one on how to move a treadmill, it can get confusing, so we won’t do that to you here. For example, what do they mean by “the end”? Which end? And what if you don’t find a latch on your particular treadmill?

 

So, watching it done can help explain the missing gaps.

 

For example, this video shows how to disassemble a treadmill before moving it:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUR7oMhFEvI

 

And this video explains how to fold a treadmill:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0N-uJ-lz9U

 

This video shows how to move a commercial treadmill (in this case for rotating within the same gym room):

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgzPHDcoV9E

 

And you can search YouTube for more tips.

 

As you can see, moving a treadmill is not extremely complicated. But since it is an expensive piece of exercise equipment, you will want to do it carefully. Take the time to protect it, and you can save yourself from having to replace any parts or worse – buy a new treadmill – because of a simple mistake.

 

Need help moving a treadmill? Our North Vancouver movers are here for you! Give us a call and we’ll give you a free estimate for the job. And yes, we help gyms move their other exercise equipment too!

 

How To Utilize Municipal Junk Removal Services In Metro Vancouver If You’re Moving

When you’re moving, you’re probably also purging. There may be junk you need to get rid of. You could pay a junk removal company to come and take it all away – and that may be your best bet for various types of junk and a big load.

 

But did you know that many Metro Vancouver cities offer free pick up or junk clear out? They are limited though, so don’t think you’ve hit the jackpot! There is a reason junk removal companies in Vancouver are so abundant.

 

In this article, we’ll let you know a few ways you can have your junk removed by city services, which you may already pay taxes for.

Corporation of Delta yearly spring clean up

 

If you are moving within or out of Delta, and if moving day is in the spring, you could plan to get rid of a lot of your junk for free. While there are limits to what the corporation will take, you can use this opportunity to throw out broken furniture, useless toys, old couches, BBQs and stuff that can be bundled up, as long as it doesn’t violate the ‘not accepted’ terms. Mattresses are not accepted – keep that in mind!

 

See more info below:

 

https://www.delta.ca/services/garbage-recycling/spring-clean-up

Burnaby large item and appliance pick up program

 

If you are a Burnaby resident, you can ask the city to come to your curb to pick up the ‘big things’ that you need to throw away. Mattresses are eligible, unlike Delta’s spring clean up rules. But, they do require you call them beforehand to make sure they will take your item. If you live in an apartment, you may have to make arrangements to move your large item to a special area, which can involve some heavy lifting.

 

See more info below:

 

https://www.burnaby.ca/City-Services/Garbage—Recycling/Large-Item—Appliance-Pick-Up.html

 

New Westminster fee-based disposal pick up service

 

Ok, this one is not free. And there may be some restrictions on what the city could pick up for you. But if you live in New Westminster, this may be worth looking into, especially if you only have one big thing you need to get rid of. Then, compare that fee with the price of having a local junk removal company come to get it.

 

See more info below:

 

https://www.newwestcity.ca/services/garbage-and-recycling/special-pick-up-sercixw

City of Richmond large item pick up

 

Like in Burnaby, residents of Richmond can take advantage of the city’s large item pick up service. However, this is clearly limited to only “four large household items per year.” And there are restrictions. But for the most part, your furniture junk should be ok. They do make a note that mattresses have to be kept dry and wrapped in plastic, so keep that in mind. They also have an online form to fill out if you don’t want to call in, so that may be a convenience to try.

 

See more info below:

 

https://www.richmond.ca/services/recycling/garbage/largeitem.htm

City of Surrey large item pick up

 

Similar to Richmond’s program, the City of Surrey offers residents – seemingly only from Newton – to dispose of up to 4 large items per year. And mattresses are accepted. You do have to call in to schedule a pick up. Also, only some apart buildings are eligible for this service: https://www.surrey.ca/city-services/21317.aspx

 

See more info below:

 

https://www.surrey.ca/city-services/4550.aspx

City of Coquitlam large item pick up

 

Again, this one is limited to 4 large items per year, and the restrictions are similar to the above programs. They don’t mention anything about apartment dwellers, but their phone number is on their site to find out more.

 

See more info below:

 

https://www.coquitlam.ca/city-services/garbage-recycling/garbage-schedule/garbage-carts-and-large-item-pick-up.aspx

 

City of Vancouver bin upgrades

 

While the City of Vancouver doesn’t advertise large item pick up, they do allow you to upgrade your bin size to accept more garbage on the regular schedule. This could be a way to accommodate your junk needs all year round, if they accumulate for you. That said, be aware of the restrictions!

 

See more info below:

 

https://vancouver.ca/home-property-development/garbage-bins-and-green-bins.aspx

Some things to keep in mind about municipal junk removal before moving

 

  • City junk removal services are not ‘full service’! You will have to sort your waste, and bring it to your curbside. If you can’t do that, it’s best you hire a junk removal company to help you out.
  • These services are also not likely going to work on your timeline. If you are trying to have junk removed last minute – especially if it’s actually on moving day – you may be in a rut. So this is something you need to plan for.
  • There may be items that are banned from city waste pick up services. You’ll need to handle these yourself by taking them to the appropriate dumping or recycling facilities.
  • Most of the time, as you’ll see in your investigations, ‘commercial’ waste is not accepted. So if you’re hoping to use these services for getting rid of your car parts or renovation junk, chances are it won’t work. They’re meant to be residential.
  • There are fines for illegal dumping, so don’t try it!

 

If you didn’t see your municipality listed above, you can google its name with “large item pick up” to see what comes up. And also, keep in mind bylaws can change all the time. So by the time you read this – especially if it is years from the date of publishing – the rules may have changed. Be sure to call your city services to find out more!

 

See related posts on our blog:

 

Coquitlam Movers Advise: How To Move A Lawn Mower

Ready for moving day? Did you forget about how to move the lawn mower? Our coquitlam movers will help you deal with this beast, by giving tips below!

 

It may be common to focus on the ‘inside’ stuff while packing for your move. But don’t forget, all the tools and forgotten junk in your shed also needs to go, to make way for the new inhabitants of the home you’re leaving.

 

If you have a yard to maintain on your current home, and will have one in your next home, you’ll probably want to bring the lawn mower with you. No need to waste that investment!

 

But hang on: you don’t want a stinky, dirty, gas-filled, spark-ready lawn mower packed up next to your clean couch, and rolling around in the moving truck. Yikes! So, follow these tips below to move your lawn mower like a pro mover (or to prep for the pro movers when they arrive!).

Before you move a lawn mower, empty its gas and unplug its flame-inducing parts

 

Professional movers will not take gasoline in their moving truck. No matter how much you beg, and no matter how small it may seem. It’s a safety hazard, and so, it’s a no-go. If you want your lawn mower to go in that moving truck, you’ll need to empty the gas. And, unplug the spark plug, so no fires happen in the moving truck, please.

 

So what do you with all that gas you paid top dollar for? You can either use it up by mowing your lawn before moving day. Or you can put it in a fancy made-for-gas container (you know the ones with the spout, and the twist seal, with the handle). You can put it in your own car to take on a short-distance move. Or, you can dispose of it according to your local city bylaw regulations.

 

But please…don’t just leave gas in a bucket in your hard…especially not in dry, hot summer.

 

Of course, if your lawn mower does not use gas, you can skip this step.

 

If your lawn mower is electric, be sure to read your product manual (or google it online), to find out if there are safety precautions to take before transporting it.

Clean your lawn mower before moving, and do some maintenance on it while you’re at it

 

Your lawn mower is probably full of dirt and grass in places you didn’t think dirt and grass could exist. Ok, maybe you did think it. Either way, you don’t want to end up with grass stains on your stuff, while it’s all crammed in a moving truck. So it’s time for clean up.

 

If your lawn mower has a bag attachment to collect grass clippings, give that a good ol’ shake-out. Then, hose it down. Or, if you have one of those pressure washers that can turbo-speed soapy water on things, maybe try that. We take no liability for the effects of this trick though.

 

For the rest of the lawn mower parts, the general consensus on the Internet is to give it a good brushing and a hose-down with a strong pressure hose attachment.

 

What to do with all the guck that comes out? Maybe compost? Check out our article on how to move a compost here.

 

While you’re making your lawn mower clean as new, you can also get on some maintenance, to keep it alive and well for your new life at your new home. Angie’s list has a blog post on how to do this:

 

https://www.angieslist.com/articles/8-maintenance-tips-keep-your-lawn-mower-running.htm

 

And yes, there are probably people you can hire to do this.

 

See related on our blog: How to find home services online after a long distance move

Find a safe solution for lawn mower blades before you pack them for moving

 

If you’re lazy, and you want to duck tape your lawn mower blades before moving, or if you want to detach them and carefully bubble wrap them, either way, you need a solution for this.

 

If you’re not comfortable handling the blades of your lawn mower, be sure to ask your moving company if they can include this in their service when they give you a moving quote. As before moving day! If this ends up costing extra, don’t be surprised. And, if they say no, also don’t be surprised. Movers need to be protected by insurance for injuries, such as by WorkSafeBC. So generally, they shouldn’t be going outside the scope of ‘normal’ when it comes to moving hazards.

 

But no, open, exposed and dangerously sharp objects can’t just be piled into a moving truck. And you wouldn’t want them banging around loosely in a box either.

 

If your blades are dull and need replacing or sharpening, maybe now is a good time to do that. Again – safely! See if a metal pick-up company will come get them for you. Though, they’d probably want the trip to be more worth their while, so collect other scrap metal for them too. If you hire a junk removal company before moving day, ask in advance if they can handle the mower blades (some may even help you disassemble them).

 

If you take blades with you, label your box, so that people know there are sharp items in there. Cardboard is not recommended here, as it can rip easily. Try plastic.

Stop the wheels from rolling around in the moving truck

 

You don’t want the lawn mower rolling in the truck. Remember – it’s got wheels! Find a way to stop the wheels from rolling. You can do this by packing heavy items in front, and behind the mower. Or you can use a wheel stopper.

Remember: not all lawn mowers are created equal, even when it comes to moving them

 

Lawn mowers may or may not be worth the move, depending how big of a move you’re making, or the value of your lawn mower. And sometimes, the tips we’ve mentioned above may not apply, depending on the lawn mower you are moving. If you have a ride-on lawn mower, for example, then you’ll need a ramp, or some other method to tow it to your new destination (on a short-distance move).

 

The other ‘treatment’ you can give your lawn mower before moving is to sell it with classified listings. Then, buy another one when you arrive at your new destination.

 

Here is an article that explains types of lawn mowers you can pick for different types of yards: https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/tools/reviews/g867/how-to-pick-the-right-mower-for-your-lawn/

 

See related posts:

 

 

 

 

Moving Large Appliances: How To Move A Deep Freezer

Moving Large Appliances – Deep Freezer

When you have large appliances you’ve invested in, you may be taking them with you on your next move. This is more likely with deep freezers as they can be an addition to a home that a family purchased out of need. However, moving large appliances can come with nuances you need to be aware of. They are not as simple as moving boxy furniture. This is because there are inner working parts inside the ‘box’ of the appliance that need to be handled carefully.

As a follow up to our article on how to move a refrigerator, in this article, we will discuss how to move a deep freezer.

 

Step one: have a safe plan for the food you will be removing from the deep freezer

This is obvious, but keep in mind that when you remove food from a deep freezer, you’ll need an action plan of what you’re going to do with it. In our article on how to pack kitchen food, we gave some tips, and discussed eating as much of your food as possible before moving day.

You can’t move a freezer with food in it. And, freezer food doesn’t have shelf life, of course. So this is going to be a bit tricky. If you are doing a short distance move, you can likely get away with buying coolers, filling them with ice or ice packs, and driving them to your new home yourself. If you can get dry ice, that may last longer. But be careful when handling dry ice!

Movers won’t move food, so don’t expect them to take care of this process.

You also probably don’t want to defrost food in a freezer and then refreeze it, as that can result in freezer burn. Not only that, there are food safety considerations at play when you defrost meats or contaminated foods. You don’t want to end up with food poisoning as a result of leaving your foods out of frozen temperatures too long. Listeria can be found in frozen foods, so this is a real concern.

This article explains in detail what to know about thawing and refreezing, or best practices for freezing foods: https://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/42968/rules-for-refreezing-food

Some foods are expensive, and if you have a deep freezer full of hunted game meat, or any meat for that matter, you may not want to throw it away as a result of having to move. So this is something you’ll want to plan for in advance.

 

Step two: unplug, defrost and clean the deep freezer before moving day

Before you move a deep freezer, you’ll want to make sure it is thawed out. Unplug it to get ready for this process. Of course, it will have to remain unplugged when the movers arrive, or when you want to load it up on a moving truck.

How long does it take to defrost a freezer? The internet will give you different advice on this; 6 hours, 8 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours…. We recommend checking the manufacturer’s website, and if you can, read up on the model you bought. Many modern freezers are frost free, but still need to thaw. If you have a freezer with frost around its sides, you might need to do some chipping away at it to help the defrost process…and to prevent a water spill after a few hours!

Here is a Wikihow article on how to defrost a freezer, which you may want to do once in a while anyway: https://www.wikihow.com/Defrost-a-Freezer

And here is an article on how to defrost a frost-free freezer: https://dadsroundtable.com/other/2014/02/defrosting-frost-free-fridge/

It’s a good idea to clean out the deep freezer too. You won’t want melted ice causing surprise water spills during the move. You also don’t want to bring bacteria along the way, which will love the warmer climate once the freezer is defrosted and unplugged. So wipe it down thoroughly. You can give it another clean when you get to your new home. This is a good opportunity to take care of this ‘spring cleaning’ chore.

 

Step three: tie it up and pad it

When moving a deep freezer, you want to keep it safe from damage. Find a way to tie the door down so it doesn’t swing open during the move (especially if it’s on its side – see below). Also, cover with blankets or some badding to prevent scratches, or worse, dents and holes. You’ll want to pack it in a moving truck in a way that it won’t move around too much, avoiding bangs and knocks on the way to your new home.

 

Step four: when moving a freezer, keep it upright if you can

Keeping a freezer or fridge upright while moving it is usually always recommended. This is because there are liquids pertinent to the operation of the deep freezer that need to stay in place to keep it working.

GE’s website says if you can’t keep it upright, “lay it down on the compressor side of the unit.”

If you move the freezer on its side, make sure it stands upright for a period of time before you plug it in again. How long? Again, best to consult your manual, or call the manufacturer, as different advice exists on this online. One common rule of thumb is to leave it upright for the same amount of time it has been on its side. This is what the GE website says (link above). Others will say 24 hours.

 

To conclude: call professionals if you need help!

Damaging your deep freezer during a move can be an unnecessary financial loss: even if your deep freezer wasn’t that expensive. Still, why waste money? Professional movers are careful and know what they’re doing when moving a freezer. They also offer insurance to protect your items from damage on moving day.

If you need help moving a deep freezer, give us a call! We offer no-obligation, free in-home estimates for families moving house.

 

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