Ferguson Moving & Storage

We lift your expectations!

Ferguson Moving & Storage

We lift your expectations!

Phone: 604 922 2212

Moving to an Urban Farm: Tips to Remember

Agrarian life within the conveniences of the city may seem like a dream. However, if you plan on moving to an urban farm in Metro Vancouver or elsewhere in B.C., there are some things to keep in mind before you make the plunge and leave your apartment life. This especially goes for moving into a home with a yard, or intending to lease city-zoned land for your new farming adventure. There may be other options available to you, which you’ll also want to consider. If you’re new to farming, and the idea of urban farming has tweaked your interest and motivated you to move, read up on some of what we’ve found. Note: Moving to start an urban farm in the Vancouver area is not quite like moving to a hobby farm. We’ve written about that subject here, and encourage you to take a look there as well. Urban farming on city properties is on the rise, but might not be totally legal yet Last year in Vancouver, a move was made to begin the legalization of urban farms in the city. It wasn’t that there weren’t urban farms in Vancouver at the time. But more that that zoning and licensing wasn’t quite clear. Urban farms in Vancouver are already established, which you can see on the list here, by the Vancouver Urban Farming Society. Vancouver’s current urban agriculture policies can be read on its site here and here (they are, essentially, now allowed). And in 2012, MacLean’s magazine was already writing about the popularity of urban agriculture, and the way of going about it for some. But we...

Advice from a cross-country Canadian moving company on Quebec moving day

Advice from a cross–country Canadian moving company on business promotion during Quebec’s moving day If you haven’t heard, thousands of Quebecois residents had to move on July 1, while the rest of the country was celebrating Canada Day. As a cross–country Canadian moving company, we couldn’t help but notice, and get excited, about the efforts of 3M to help people out on a mass-moving day like that in Quebec. Here are a couple links to read more about the story: http://globalnews.ca/news/2798947/moving–day-eh-thousands-of-quebecers-pack-up/ http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/about-200000-people-moved-in-quebec-today While we applaud 3M for their efforts to pay-it-forward for Quebec movers, we thought it would also be valuable to give some tips to other companies who want to do some promotional work on moving days. If you are outside Quebec, keep in mind that in other provinces, people will most likely move at the beginning and end of months, so you can apply these principles to your own location too. Keep safety in mind: don’t try to help Canadian movers if you’re not trained to do so You will notice in the articles linked to above, when 3M jumped in to help Canadian movers, it wasn’t by heavy lifting (that we know of). It was more on the side of offering refreshments, and being a friendly face on that day. Moving can be dangerous business: not just for humans, but also for the artifacts being moved. The last thing you want as a company is to have an employee injured on the job, or injuring others while moving. And also, you don’t want your company ruining people’s furniture or houses while moving. Our advice is to keep...

Cons of buying and moving to a private island in Canada

Buying and moving to an island in Canada: Part 2, the cons Last week we talked about why you’d want to buy a Canadian island and move there, even if it’s only for part of the year. Surprisingly, island ownership is not out of reach for typical middle-class earners. Especially not so when considering the possibility of combined ownership. But after you buy the island, as Bloomberg so classically puts it, you’ll need to “figure out how you’re going to stay alive on the island.” And we dare say, it gets more difficult than just that! Let’s explore some cons of moving to an island, or owning one. Moving to an island usually means living without basic amenities, or building them yourself When you move to an island, a huge costly setback to your idealistic goal will likely be about building – and we’re not just talking about shelter. There is also water supply, electricity and even a toilet to think about. This is explained in more detail in the Bloomberg article mentioned above, and others. Here are some general things to know: Islands are isolated, so transporting building material to the site will be much more expensive than transporting to larger inhabited areas. Now imagine what a moving company would charge to ferry or fly in your furniture! (This isn’t the kind of place you’d want to helicopter in a grand piano, get where we’re going with this?) Even if you have the money, there can be environmental restrictions and regulations surrounding what you can and can not build on the site. Then, even without government laws or money being a setback,...

How to prevent and fix roof leaks before and after moving

How to prevent fix roof leaks for Vancouver movers Maybe you’ve moved into a Metro Vancouver house and discovered that there’s a leak. Or maybe you’re considering moving into an older house and want to make sure it’s in good condition. Now would be a good time to learn how to prevent and fix roof leaks before your next move. Prevention is the best cure: get a roof inspection before buying a house First, know your rights before buying and moving into a new house. CBC has reported that sellers in every province are required to disclose every major defect to prospective buyers, regardless of whether it is hidden or not. That means you should pay attention to the house’s disclosure statement, which should list any roof defects in the house. If the disclosure statement is clean, you may want to hire a home inspector anyway. As we saw in the above CBC article, a disclosure statement may not be enough to protect you from a leaky roof (the article was about a basement leak, but the same disclosure problems could arise from leaking roofs.) If a leak is uncovered soon after you buy the house, sellers can still argue that either they didn’t know about the leak or that the damage occurred after you moved into your new home. So to be extra safe, it’s probably best to enlist the help of a certified home inspector. There are no guarantees that they can uncover any or all roof leaks or defects, but it’s probably a good idea to get an impartial third party to assess your potential new Vancouver...

Hiring a Interior Designer Before you Hire your Vancouver Moving Company

Why you should hire a professional interior designer or decorator before you move in Metro Vancouver Stunning hotel lobbies, beautiful lounges and cheerful-looking bars don’t happen by accident. Chances are, if you like the way a place looks, professional interior decorators and designers had a hand in making it happen. But most people think this is a luxury only afforded to corporate buildings or the homes of the very wealthy. There may be some truth to that idea, but the reality is almost everyone can benefit from hiring an interior designer to scope out your new home and give tips on how to optimize the layout both before and after you move in. If you are relocating all of your belongings, an interior designer may save time, storage, and money! Learn the differences between a professional interior designer and an interior decorator Interior designers and decorators aren’t the same thing! Before you move into your new home, you should determine whose services you will need the most. It’s common to confuse both professions, but in reality they have different specialties. Interior decorators are more concerned with aesthetics, such as choosing the perfect wallpaper colour scheme. On the other hand, interior designers are more focused on functionality, like how to optimize space or direct foot traffic in your home. This could be really useful when determining how you’d like to lay out furniture in your new home before your move in. But an important note is that an interior designer’s training often overlaps with decoration, while the same cannot be said about interior decorators. Another thing to keep in mind is...

Tips for Moving into Metro Vancouver as a Retiree

What to look for when moving as a retiree in Metro Vancouver Some retirees believe that moving to have a fresh start is a good idea. It’s nice to have a change of scenery, possibly downsize to save on expenses, and have a chance to move closer to people and places you love. If you or your loved ones are looking to move or relocate after leaving the workforce, there are some important factors to consider. In this article, we would like to address some of these factors and give you some insight on where to move for your retirement. Moving to the Vancouver area to retire with money in mind Affordable housing is a challenge in the real estate market in the Metro Vancouver area. If you are going to move into a rented dwelling, it is in your best interest to find the houses with the best value. The best valued renting homes are the ones where their selling prices do not mirror the renting prices. For example, in East Vancouver, it seems that even though rent is among the lowest in the Metro Vancouver area, housing prices are usually in the mid-range. BC Housing is also a great resource to look into. They offer two different programs that you may be eligible for as a retiree: the Seniors’ Rental Housing program and the Subsidized Housing program. You may apply to these programs if you are someone older than 55 years of age with a gross household income below a designated income threshold. This Senior Rental Housing threshold is currently at $58,000 for those who are living...