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Moving High Tech Offices

The digital age is changing the way we do a lot of things. For example, the music and publishing businesses have had to adjust the way they operate. People don’t seem to be inclined to go to a physical store and buy a CD or a book anymore. Instead, they download songs or e-books. The moving business is also rethinking the way it does business. Moving an office in the digital age is a totally different from moving in the 1990s and before. Nowadays, most offices are heavily reliant on computers and have much less paper. That translates into moving more delicate, expensive equipment and less heavy filing cabinets. We’ll talk about these differences in detail throughout this article. And it’s a good time to do so because many office spaces will probably be opening up soon in the Metro Vancouver area.

Moving an office in the digital age requires movers to handle delicate electronics

Back in the day — the 1990s! — moving an office often meant transporting many bulky filing cabinets and documents. Movers had to be trained to handle and store paper documents. For example, an obvious no-no that all movers would probably have drilled into their head is to avoid putting paper files in damp, wet places. Imagine the horror of discovering ink dripping right off all the documents after moving offices!

Moving an office in the digital age requires us movers to adapt the way we move office equipment. Instead of filing cabinets, moving computers and other electronic equipment has become the new norm.

That means movers have to become familiar with the equipment they are transporting. For example, good movers will have done their homework as to whether magnets can corrupt electronics. A smart mover will also know electronic computer components (e.g. a motherboard) should be shielded from static when being moved.  Knowledge of what can damage electronic equipment will inform where and how items will be stored and handled during a move.

Meticulous organization is required when moving an office in the digital age

In some cases, moving an office in the digital age can be even harder than moving an office before files became stored in computers. We have heard of a case when an unorganized move cost a research lab weeks of precious time! The culprit? The computers and wiring were sloppily labelled, which meant that workers had to spend way too much time trying to figure out which wire connected to which!

While you may not be running a research lab, many offices use a network of computers to maintain databases or in-office servers. That usually means a lot of wires, a lot of CPUs, a lot of…well you get the idea.

Nowadays, movers sometimes have to take on the role of professional organizers. We often have to figure out a system for labelling, transporting and handling electronics. And because every office is different, we have to customize the way we do it each time! The goal? To make setting electronics up in the new office space seamless and quick!

How to choose a smart office mover in the digital age

As you can see, moving offices in the digital age comes with its own set of unique challenges. It’s very different when compared with moving before the times when offices started relying more heavily on information technology. So when you’re choosing a mover, ask yourself how many electronics your office has. If it is heavily reliant on computers, be sure to ask the potential movers about their procedures for handling, transporting and organizing electronics. It can save you a lot of headaches!

A Good Moving Company in Vancouver

As Vancouver’s oldest moving company, we’re proud to help keep you informed to ensure your move is as smooth as possible!

For all your moving & storage needs, whether you’re moving within Vancouver or  moving abroad, contact Ferguson Moving and Storage at 604-922-2212 and find out more about us online!

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