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What To Know About Relocation Packages When You Move In Canada For A Job

Relocation Packages and Long Distance Moves When you work for a company, and they ask you to move in Canada to take a new position in another city, you may get a relocation package. Relocation packages can come in the form of stipends for moving, salary bonuses, temporary housing, long distance moving services covered by the company, or other help getting settled in to your new home (and life!). In this article, we’ll discuss what you should know about relocation packages when you move in Canada for a job. Relocation expenses are not tax benefits for companies, usually According to the CRA, the expenses of moving an employee to a new city are not eligible for tax deductions. See this page: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/bsnss/tpcs/pyrll/bnfts/prvdd/mvng/menu-eng.html   However, depending on the circumstance, an employee may be able to claim relocation costs as taxable benefits. See this page for more info: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/bsnss/tpcs/pyrll/bnfts/prvdd/mvng/txbl-eng.html   There may also be taxable benefits if you get a home relocation loan by your company. See this page for more info: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/bsnss/tpcs/pyrll/bnfts/prvdd/mvng/hm-eng.html   This article on Monster.ca also covers this topic: https://www.monster.ca/career-advice/article/tax-deductions-when-moving-for-work-or-school Relocation packages can include temporary accommodation, or company housing Sometimes, people who have to relocate for their jobs are put up in a home paid for by the company – for them and their family. It might be cheaper for the company than paying for you to travel a lot on business. If you are asked to find the accommodation, for reimbursement later, check out our article on this topic here: Finding temporary accommodation when doing a cross country move in Canada You can negotiate your relocation package...

Finding Temporary Accommodation When Doing A Cross Country Move In Canada

Finding Temporary Accommodation When Doing A Cross Country Move In Canada When you’re planning a cross country move in Canada, there are going to be multiple factors to consider, no doubt. Balancing the timeline of events will be a little tricky. If you’re selling your home, your closing date may not have the 30-60 day window that will allow you to find a new place to live with ample notice. And even if it does, you might not find the perfect permanent dwelling in that time.   When you’re moving cross country in Canada, even if you’re not selling your home, but plan to move out of a rental, or plan to rent out your existing home, you have get used to your new neighbourhood. Deciding where to move in Toronto, for example, is not the same as deciding where to live in Vancouver. Traffic and distances are different – what took you 30 minutes to commute in Vancouver could take more than an hour in a bigger city. School districts may be organized differently, or come with different rules. Access to amenities could make your life more or less difficult.   And that’s all on top of finding the right space, with the right number of bedrooms, and the right decor style that fits you.   In short, moving is not as cut and dry as packing up one home, and then moving into another on the same day, or even within a few days.   Other times, you need a temporary place to stay while your home is being repaired or renovated.   You might need to...

Saving Money In Real Estate Sale Services When Moving In Canada

Moving is expensive. And so is selling your home. However, when you are moving in Canada, you have some options when it comes to saving money on real estate services. These savings can come in many forms, and during different steps in the process. In this article, we’ll explore some of these options. Sell your home using the FSBO method   FSBO stands for “For Sale By Owner” and it refers to the private sale of a home. Websites like this one are out there to help people do this. The world of real estate may seem like a mystery. Or you may think there is a big, and good reason why real estate agents pay a few thousand dollars to take a real estate course, and then more to join a broker firm.   However, there are home sellers who do all the work that real estate agent does, saving themselves the commission fee they would normally pay a sales agent.   But according to this article, don’t be fooled into thinking there are no fees with this method. It just means you take on the costs of selling the home, including the real estate lawyer fees. It also means you do all the work, and will have to learn the ropes when it comes to negotiations on your home price. This isn’t exactly like listing your patio furniture for sale on Craigslist. There is more that goes into selling a house when you are moving in Canada.   Some are calling the real estate agent service a rip off, for the amount of work they do. Selling...

What to know if you want to do an international move to Canada

Moving to Canada, eh? A few months ago the internet was all the rage about Americans searching on the topic of how to move to Canada if Trump wins the U.S. election. But according to Justin Trudeau, the idea is not new. And, according to one comedian, the viable options of places to move in Canada are probably limited for most Americans, who either don’t like the cold, or can’t speak French. Check out that video here for a good laugh. And let’s not forget, with Brexit in the mix, the Brits also seem to want to move to Canada. But this article is not about moving internationally to Canada only if you’re not happy with your politicians (in a relatively peaceful country, we mean!). People move to Canada for a variety of reasons. And as a moving company in Canada – one that has helped international movers in the past – we thought we’d give a bit of advice on the topic. It can be quite logistical! We also wrote about some practical tips to help make the move emotionally easier: Tips for moving a household far away from ‘home’: International Moving and Long Distance Tips While we will give some more logistical advice and tips here, be sure to also consult a legal professional on the topic if you are planning an immigration as a non-Canadian. And, before you start your move, get some good quotes and advice from international movers before you start shipping your belongings overseas. They’ll know how to help for your specific case. Consider legalities of immigration before you call international movers in Canada According...

Cons of buying and moving to a private island in Canada

Buying and moving to an island in Canada: Part 2, the cons Last week we talked about why you’d want to buy a Canadian island and move there, even if it’s only for part of the year. Surprisingly, island ownership is not out of reach for typical middle-class earners. Especially not so when considering the possibility of combined ownership. But after you buy the island, as Bloomberg so classically puts it, you’ll need to “figure out how you’re going to stay alive on the island.” And we dare say, it gets more difficult than just that! Let’s explore some cons of moving to an island, or owning one. Moving to an island usually means living without basic amenities, or building them yourself When you move to an island, a huge costly setback to your idealistic goal will likely be about building – and we’re not just talking about shelter. There is also water supply, electricity and even a toilet to think about. This is explained in more detail in the Bloomberg article mentioned above, and others. Here are some general things to know: Islands are isolated, so transporting building material to the site will be much more expensive than transporting to larger inhabited areas. Now imagine what a moving company would charge to ferry or fly in your furniture! (This isn’t the kind of place you’d want to helicopter in a grand piano, get where we’re going with this?) Even if you have the money, there can be environmental restrictions and regulations surrounding what you can and can not build on the site. Then, even without government laws or money being a setback,...