We lift your expectations!

How to Move a Mattress Surrey

Surrey movers explain how to move a mattress The logistics of how to move furniture can be tough when they are large items. But what about large items that are hard to even grasp a hold of? Like mattresses for instance. If they don’t come with handle straps, or if you need to curve them around tight corners, you may struggle with them. And that’s just the beginning. Getting the mattress to your destination involves other logistics as well. Below our Surrey movers will explain how to move a mattress, which can vary depending on if you are moving in Metro Vancouver or if you are planning a long distance move. Step 1: prep the mattress before moving day Keeping the mattress clean before moving it The last thing you’ll want is to have a dirty mattress by the time it arrives at your new home. So before moving day, be sure you are ready for the movers topick it up. Movers may have moving blankets, and that might help. But those are usually used to protect hard furniture that can dent or damage walls. The better bet for a moving a mattress would be to wrap it in plastic, or some other protective material to prevent moisture creeping into it. You can, of course, create a makeshift plastic cover for a mattress using painter’s plastic sheets, tarps or shower curtains. Just add some tape or rope to keep it in-tact. Or, you could buy specially designed mattress covers for moving. For example, here is one we found online at Home Depot’s Canadian site: https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.queenking-mattress-bag.1000729677.html And here is a vinyl...

What to know if you want to do an international move to Canada

Moving to Canada, eh? A few months ago the internet was all the rage about Americans searching on the topic of how to move to Canada if Trump wins the U.S. election. But according to Justin Trudeau, the idea is not new. And, according to one comedian, the viable options of places to move in Canada are probably limited for most Americans, who either don’t like the cold, or can’t speak French. Check out that video here for a good laugh. And let’s not forget, with Brexit in the mix, the Brits also seem to want to move to Canada. But this article is not about moving internationally to Canada only if you’re not happy with your politicians (in a relatively peaceful country, we mean!). People move to Canada for a variety of reasons. And as a moving company in Canada – one that has helped international movers in the past – we thought we’d give a bit of advice on the topic. It can be quite logistical! We also wrote about some practical tips to help make the move emotionally easier: Tips for moving a household far away from ‘home’: International Moving and Long Distance Tips While we will give some more logistical advice and tips here, be sure to also consult a legal professional on the topic if you are planning an immigration as a non-Canadian. And, before you start your move, get some good quotes and advice from international movers before you start shipping your belongings overseas. They’ll know how to help for your specific case. Consider legalities of immigration before you call international movers in Canada According...

Tips from movers in North Vancouver: How to prepare for moving into a boat or yacht

How to prepare for moving into a boat or yacht As movers in North Vancouver, we love the coast just as much as anyone else here. This is why we think moving onto a boat is such a great idea! Of course, if you have the will for it! Whether you are retiring and fully moving onto a boat, or taking a couple years off from work and stashing your things in North Vancouver storage to go exploring, we can help you prepare for your move. Before you even contact moving companies in North Vancouver, start downsizing You will need to follow tips for downsizing just as if you were moving into a smaller house. According to Visit My Harbour, getting rid of your stuff is the number one thing to do when moving from a house into a 300 to 500 square foot boat. This also applies to appliances, as they can be quite heavy, and are not always necessary. So start early, and be ruthless! You usually need a lot less than you think. Check out our tips for downsizing from movers in North Vancouver: http://www.fergusonmoving.com/blog/moving-tips-downsizing-vancouver Have a yard sale or talk to a local charity about donating prior to moving in North Vancouver Especially if you are moving from a North Vancouver home after many years, you will most likely have many things to get rid of after downsizing. Before bringing anything in decent condition to the dump, try having a yard sale, or ask local charities if they could use any of the things you have to offer. Donating your used belongings or donating the...

Richmond movers list important numbers and sites

Richmond movers list important phone numbers and websites to keep handy after you move to Richmond We’ve formerly written about 5 reasons to move to Richmond, B.C. And, as Richmond Movers, we love helping our clients with all things related to moving. On this blog post, we’re going to list some important phone numbers and websites to keep handy when you move to Richmond. Before we get started, keep in mind that the city of Richmond BC publishes a ‘Newcomer’s Guide’ that you may want to take a look at: http://www.richmond.ca/discover/about/newcomersguide.htm?PageMode=HTML Public Transportation info for the City of Richmond, B.C. Translink and the Coast Mountain Bus Company are what runs the public transportation in Richmond, B.C. The following page of the city’s website describes what you need to know about available routes, phone numbers or websites related to public transport in Richmond. http://www.richmond.ca/discover/services/bus.htm This is a PDF showing the Richmond and South Delta bus routes: http://infomaps.translink.ca/System_Maps/123/RDT-Jun%202016.pdf This is a page offering PDF downloads for the bus routes of other areas in the Lower Mainland, should you need to travel out of Richmond: http://www.translink.ca/en/Schedules-and-Maps/Transit-System-Maps.aspx Taxi cab companies in Richmond For private transportation options, here are a few options for taxi services in Richmond: Richmond Taxi Ltd: (604) 272-1111 Garden City Cabs: (604) 233-1111 Kimber Cabs: (604) 238-8888 Garbage and recycling pick up information – useful for after you move to Richmond! Right after you move to Richmond, you’re probably going to start wondering when garbage and recycling days are! And you’ll need that service if you’re purging while unpacking too. This page of the City’s website shows a visual map of garbage...

Surrey movers exploring Langley housing options: what we found

So, the Vancouver Giants are moving to Langley, did you hear? If even sports teams are doing it, it kinda makes you wonder if YOU should move to Langley, right? Well, as Surrey movers, we thought we’d scope out some info on that topic, since, after all, our job is to help people move to Langley, and other places alike. But our job always works best when our moving company customers have a place to move into first! So let’s look at a few factors surrounding Langley housing options. What does it cost to move to Langley? Housing prices in Langley The price of a house in Langley may not be THAT much different than in other Vancouver suburbs. But, one big factor to consider is that PRICE does not always assume VALUE. You could be getting more ‘house for your buck’ (or ‘land for your buck’!) when you move to Langley. And, as Surrey movers who move more than just houses, we can tell you that price also depends on what you’re looking for. Is it land that you can farm or build on? Is it a small condo? A $30K mobile home? A brand new build? A giant house in a nice rural area? An ice rink for a sports team to play in? Using a property search website, you can find an array of housing and property prices, depending on your budget and what you’re looking for: http://www.rew.ca/properties/areas/langley-bc But to give you a ballpark idea, using what’s called a “benchmark price,” a detached home in Langley was averaging $747,900 not too long ago (from time of...

Cons of buying and moving to a private island in Canada

Buying and moving to an island in Canada: Part 2, the cons Last week we talked about why you’d want to buy a Canadian island and move there, even if it’s only for part of the year. Surprisingly, island ownership is not out of reach for typical middle-class earners. Especially not so when considering the possibility of combined ownership. But after you buy the island, as Bloomberg so classically puts it, you’ll need to “figure out how you’re going to stay alive on the island.” And we dare say, it gets more difficult than just that! Let’s explore some cons of moving to an island, or owning one. Moving to an island usually means living without basic amenities, or building them yourself When you move to an island, a huge costly setback to your idealistic goal will likely be about building – and we’re not just talking about shelter. There is also water supply, electricity and even a toilet to think about. This is explained in more detail in the Bloomberg article mentioned above, and others. Here are some general things to know: Islands are isolated, so transporting building material to the site will be much more expensive than transporting to larger inhabited areas. Now imagine what a moving company would charge to ferry or fly in your furniture! (This isn’t the kind of place you’d want to helicopter in a grand piano, get where we’re going with this?) Even if you have the money, there can be environmental restrictions and regulations surrounding what you can and can not build on the site. Then, even without government laws or money being a setback,...