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Advice from a cross-country Canadian moving company on Quebec moving day

Advice from a cross–country Canadian moving company on business promotion during Quebec’s moving day If you haven’t heard, thousands of Quebecois residents had to move on July 1, while the rest of the country was celebrating Canada Day. As a cross–country Canadian moving company, we couldn’t help but notice, and get excited, about the efforts of 3M to help people out on a mass-moving day like that in Quebec. Here are a couple links to read more about the story: http://globalnews.ca/news/2798947/moving–day-eh-thousands-of-quebecers-pack-up/ http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/about-200000-people-moved-in-quebec-today While we applaud 3M for their efforts to pay-it-forward for Quebec movers, we thought it would also be valuable to give some tips to other companies who want to do some promotional work on moving days. If you are outside Quebec, keep in mind that in other provinces, people will most likely move at the beginning and end of months, so you can apply these principles to your own location too. Keep safety in mind: don’t try to help Canadian movers if you’re not trained to do so You will notice in the articles linked to above, when 3M jumped in to help Canadian movers, it wasn’t by heavy lifting (that we know of). It was more on the side of offering refreshments, and being a friendly face on that day. Moving can be dangerous business: not just for humans, but also for the artifacts being moved. The last thing you want as a company is to have an employee injured on the job, or injuring others while moving. And also, you don’t want your company ruining people’s furniture or houses while moving. Our advice is to keep...

Winter Moving in Vancouver, Dealing with Rats & Mice

Dealing with rats and mice after moving into your house in the winter Winter is just around the corner, and the colder temperatures may force some pests to seek refuge in your home. Mice and rats may be some of the unwanted house guests that invite themselves over. We’ve briefly touched in this blog about how to spot rats and mice before you move in, so check that out if you haven’t yet. With that being said, sometimes it can be hard or even impossible to perfectly screen a new home for pests. So we’re going to take a quick look at how to deal with rats and mice in your new Vancouver home once you’ve finished moving in. Dealing with mice and rats — how and when do rodents move in? According to the New York Times, mice may start moving into your house to avoid colder temperatures as winter starts. Since the common house mouse is pretty small — something like an ounce in weight and two inches long — they can often find a way into your home. One common way is through piping. Many mice and some rats are often just small enough to make the journey through pipes and into your house. The solution? Plug it up! Most pipes can often be blocked off by stuffing them with materials such as sponges or steel wool. If that doesn’t work, try stretching wire mesh over openings that are too big to be plugged up. Garage doors can sometimes be a point of entry that homeowners overlook. The weatherstripping on garage doors is sometimes worn and...

Moving Tips, Metro Vancouver’s Landfill & Large Trash Options

Options for taking large trash items to a landfill before moving in Metro Vancouver So let’s say you’re about to move within Metro Vancouver and you’ve finished cleaning out your old house. It’s clear that not everything is worth moving, and in many cases not even worth giving away. And to top it off, many Metro Vancouver city garbage...

What to do if you’ve moved into a house with asbestos

So you moved into a greater Vancouver house with asbestos The Metro Vancouver area is filled with many houses that have long, intriguing histories. It’s no wonder many people jump at the chance to move into an older house! But there are sometimes a few challenges that can arise. Probably one of the biggest issues is that building regulations were different decades ago. That meant it was okay for houses to be constructed with materials that we now know are harmful. Asbestos is one example of this. In this article, we’ll discuss what you should do if you’ve moved into a house with asbestos. Why you should be concerned if you’ve moved into a house with asbestos According to Thisoldhouse.com, asbestos was once prized as a building material because it is a durable, fire-resistant material that also happens to be a great insulator. Asbestos is also good at stifling sound, allowing people in separate rooms to enjoy privacy and quiet. These qualities made it one of the prime choices for building homes up until the 1970s. However, in more recent years, it has been discovered asbestos can create lung problems. Prolonged exposure can result in lung diseases such as cancer. The problem lies in the fact that tiny asbestos fibers can be inhaled, damaging lung tissue. Locate asbestos in your home If you’ve moved into a house with asbestos, locating the material is often the first step to removing it. However, before we go any further we should mention the province says in HeathLinkBC.ca removal is not always the answer. Sometimes disturbing asbestos — especially if it’s behind a wall...

Tips on painting before moving in Vancouver (Part 2)

PART 2: Tips on Painting Before Moving in Vancouver Last week, we covered three helpful tips on painting before moving. In this article, we will cover three more tips. We hope these six tips will decrease the stress levels with moving and preparing your new home in Vancouver. Tip 4: go green for your health and for the environment Vancouver is all about living in a healthy and environmentally-friendly way. This can be incorporated into your move in Vancouver with how you pick your paint. If you look carefully, some paint cans will advertise how their paint has low, or no VOCs. VOC, or volatile organic compounds, are solvents that get released into their air as paint dries. VOCs are in other substances such as glues, cleaning supplies, and even air fresheners. VOCs can cause acute symptoms, such as dizziness, headaches, and respiratory irritation. Long term exposure, especially with young children or infants are linked to neurological damage and cancer, among many other risks. Having a low VOC or no VOC type paint will not only eliminate harmful chemicals being released into the air, it will also eliminate the odor of a freshly painted room. While it is good to read all the labels, something to keep in mind is that VOCs can be added to the paint after it is delivered to the retail store. Often, after adding various colourants in the paint, VOC levels will increase significantly. Here is a helpful list of zero or low VOC paints that are within Canada’s safety regulations after tinting. Tip 5: Buy paint that will do the work for you There are actually...

How to Avoid Moving Mold to Your New Home

Moving in Vancouver? Here are some Tips to Avoid Bringing Mould with You to Your New Home! Moulds are fungi that can occur both indoors and outdoors. Most moulds are spread by spores, which are carried in the air. These spores can survive harsh conditions and will begin growing in a particular surface only when the environment is favourable to them. If you find them in your house, they’re bad news. Moulds are linked to many health problems, such as respiratory issues, skin and eye irritation, or headaches. Many movers in BC can attest to the fact that mould is a big issue in many homes. The climate in BC is naturally damp, so moisture is always present. Moulds are Able to Thrive and Grow as Long as they are Given Moisture, Food, and Time When a house is wet, from a pipe leakage, or constant moisture (such as a bathroom without ventilation that is used frequently for showers), we know that mould can be present. This is the first key component in the growth of mould, and it is not always obvious. Secondly, mould spores need nutrients. Most mould feed off of cellulose. Conveniently for them and inconveniently for us, many building materials such as wood, parts of drywall, fabrics, and many others are cellulose-based. Third, since most spores are small, by the time we notice mould in our homes, they have already begun growing. The best way to deal with mould is clearly to prevent it. If you are moving it is pertinent to not bring the spores with you – they spread very easily. Before moving out of your old house, you need...